Archive for the ‘Organisational Development’ category

University in a changing world: Building the organisation

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February 24th, 2014

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Universities are complex systems, whose sense of being a single entity or organisation is often very mixed. At one level, people often share common procedures and systems for recruiting and enrolling students. Support services also have a degree of homogeneity, though even this breaks down if there are multiple sites. Faculties or schools may use […]

The rhetoric of change: 5 things that bug me

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January 8th, 2014

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I have been mulling over the nature of change recently, in the context of a couple of programmes I am delivering in the near future. And I noticed the Grinch in me getting irritated. For a while, I couldn’t quite place why I felt inclined to start lobbing Xmas puddings and dumplings around, and then […]

The fallacy of the unmeasurable ‘soft’ intervention

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December 5th, 2013

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When the clamour for change reaches fever pitch, as it is around the NHS at present, evidence based decision-making can fall by the wayside. For example, threatening Foundation Trusts and hospitals with the loss or reduction of their indemnity cover hits all the right notes if your approach to performance management is ‘carrot and stick’. […]

Universities in a Changing World 5: The Pull of History

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December 3rd, 2013

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What does a university education mean? How well do universities transmit – or perhaps – translate this message for the modern world. And in this very diverse world, are there many meanings, a few, or just one? Let’s explore this. As an 18 year old leaving Wales for academe, I was encouraged to believe the […]

Employee Engagement: 79% of employees have not heard of it

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November 27th, 2013

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In a recent study of employees across the UK, conducted by Surveylab, a striking statistic emerged: nigh on 80% of those polled had not heard of the term ‘Employee Engagement’.  I picked up on this statistic via Doug Shaw’s excellent blog, and the conversation in the comments at end of his post are worth a read, not least because […]